The Federal Aviation Administration will begin auditing Boeing’s aircraft production and increase manufacturing oversight in response to the Alaska Airlines jetliner door panel blow out last week.

The agency’s announcement Friday comes a day after it announced an investigation into whether Boeing failed to make sure a fuselage panel that blew off was safe and manufactured to meet the approved design.

 

The FAA said that it would audit Boeing’s 737 Max 9 jetliner production line, as well as the company’s parts suppliers “to evaluate Boeing’s compliance with its approved quality procedures.”

The FAA statement also said it would look into safety risks from the agency delegating inspection authority to company employees, and will consider moving those functions to an independent third party.

“It is time to re-examine the delegation of authority and assess any associated safety risks,” FAA Administrator Mike Whitaker said in the statement.

The agency also will increase monitoring of 737-Max incidents that happen while the plane is in use.

Boeing said Thursday it would cooperate with the FAA investigation, which is focusing on plugs used to fill spots for extra doors when those exits are not required for safety reasons on Boeing 737 Max 9 jetliners.

The FAA investigation is focusing on plugs used to fill spots for extra doors when those exits are not required for safety reasons on Boeing 737 Max 9 jetliners.

One of two plugs on an Alaska Airlines jetliner blew out shortly after the plane took off from Portland, Oregon, a week ago, leaving a hole in the plane. The cabin lost pressure and the plane was forced to make an emergency landing.

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